Bible, Elementary(K-6), English-Language Arts, High School(9-12), Jr. High(7-8), Online Resources, Special Needs

Bible Memory Through Song

Today we are sharing resources for learning Bible verses through song.  Feel free to comment and add your suggestions below.  Many of the suggestions let you listen to a sample, so please try to do so before purchasing if you want to be sure the music is agreeable for your home.

“The songs that had cheered the wilderness wandering were sung.  God’s commandments were chanted, and, bound up with the blessed influences of nature and of kindly human association, they were forever fixed in the memory of many a child and youth.”  ~Education 42.1

“The history of the songs of the Bible is full of suggestion as to the uses and benefits of music and song.  Music is often perverted to serve purposes of evil, and thus becomes one of the most alluring agencies of temptation.  But, rightly employed, it is a precious gift of God, designed to uplift the thoughts to the high and noble themes, to inspire and elevate the soul” ~My Life Today 90.3

* denotes an SDA resource

 

*Benjamin NG Scripture songs – YouTube

Hide ‘Em in Your Heart:  Bible Memory Melodies, Volume 1 and 2 by Steve Green (older CDs, may be hard to find)

*Hide it In Your Heart – YouTube

*Musical Memory Verses – YouTube Channel, Leah is very creative with her songs.

*Neville Peters – By the Word album

Scripture Lullabies – you can purchase CD’s or stream on major streaming platforms

*Scripture Singer – website and app (apple and android), also playlists on YouTube

Scripture Songs CDs – By Patty Vailant (on YouTube, Amazing Facts bookstore, Amazon, etc.)

Sing the KJV – learn whole chapters…free sheet music, also on YouTube.

*SonLight Education Ministry – Search the Family Bible Lessons Folder, the 2-8 Grade Lessons (Desire of All Nations), and Music Song Books.

Songs for Saplings- ABC by Dana Dirksen

Songs for Saplings-123 by Dana Dirksen

*Thy Word Creations:   Songbook/Activity books with a CD

*Trilogy Scripture Resources 

English-Language Arts, High School(9-12), Planning/Scheduling

Thinking About High School English – A Revisit

I’m revisiting this post because there are currently some questions about high school English curriculum on the AHE email group.  When this post was first written, my oldest was a high school sophmore.  Since then I have graduated two high schoolers.  I was curious- Have I changed my mind about what I’ve written?   No, my thoughts/advice remain the same.  It is especially important to choose curriculum in light of your student’s strengths and weakness. 

 

Thinking about high school English/Language Arts (ELA) curriculum? Things to consider as you make your choices: What are your student’s future educational goals? Is your student planning to pursue vocational training or attend a college/university? What are your student’s strengths and weaknesses when it comes to reading and written communication skills.

high school englishVocational training programs will require basic technical reading comprehension skills as well as basic writing abilities. Your student will also need to be able to communicate effectively on written tests. It might be a good idea to compare your student’s abilities with the minimum high school competencies for ELA in your local area. Many high school competency ELA tests mirror the level of essential skills needed for success in vocational studies.

If your student is planning to complete a degree program at a college or university, then your focus will be different. Acquiring strong composition skills, especially in the areas of report of information, persuasive and analytical writing will be a priority. A college-bound student will also want to develop an outlining/note-taking strategy to help with keeping track of lecture information.

What to do for literature studies? The answer is one of personal family preference. Many SDA families choose to exclude fiction from literature study. It is important to note that literature study can be accomplished without fiction: essays, biographies, journals and other non-fictions works can provide the foundation for analytical writing, one of the main purposes for literature study.

Continued grammar or vocabulary lessons and the study of Greek/Latin roots can be helpful for students preparing to take the SAT or ACT.

Resources:

Online Grammar Handbook– from the University of Minnesota.  Helpful for high school level students to see what type of writing and competency is required at the college level.

Elements of Style : classic writing handbook

Merriam-Webster – online dictionary with a Word-of-the-Day

SAT Question of the Day – get an idea of what type of grammar/writing is on the test.